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Trying out the Nikon Achromatic 10x
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tevans9129



Joined: 30 Nov 2017
Posts: 126
Location: TN

PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2018 6:53 pm    Post subject: Trying out the Nikon Achromatic 10x Reply with quote

I have no idea what this critter is, it is approximately 1.5mm wide and perhaps 25-30mm long with "pinchers" on the end. Background and lighting needs work, other suggestions appreciated.

D800e, pn11, pb6 closed, 9.5x, Nikon Achromatic 10x, 1/3, ISO 125, 200 slices @ 8 microns, Controlmynikon, Stackshot, Zerene, 2 studio 300ii lights 1/8, double Styrofoam cups for diffusion.



Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/bearevans/


Last edited by tevans9129 on Tue Jan 30, 2018 2:20 pm; edited 1 time in total
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 18504
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2018 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting critter! Seems like the shape of the mouthparts should be distinctive, but I do not recognize them.

Well photographed -- looks like you have good control of your illumination and stacking now.

Any chance of showing us a whole-body shot, just to help with the ID?

--Rik
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mawyatt



Joined: 22 Aug 2013
Posts: 1199
Location: Clearwater

PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2018 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great shot, nice detail & lighting. Looks like the styrofoam cup diffusers with the AC 300II strobes are working well Very Happy

That could be the leading monster in a sci fi movie, that is one scary critter Surprised

Best,
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leonardturner



Joined: 14 Mar 2013
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Location: Atlanta, GA, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 5:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Impressive, all around.
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Olympusman



Joined: 15 Jan 2012
Posts: 3513

PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 9:00 am    Post subject: Critter Reply with quote

Looks like a mite.

Mike
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 9:41 am    Post subject: Re: Critter Reply with quote

Olympusman wrote:
Looks like a mite.

That was my first impression too, but it's not consistent with Ted's description of "approximately 1.5mm wide and perhaps 25-30mm long with "pinchers" on the end."

--Rik

Edit: correct typo in name


Last edited by rjlittlefield on Mon Jan 29, 2018 5:48 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Dalantech



Joined: 03 Aug 2008
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually I think that the dual light setup gave you some nice shadows and kept the critter from looking flat -a big problem with most stacks. Looks like you had a key light at the top and a fill to camera left. Might try getting the fill a little higher next time (if possible). Look for a way to deepen the shadows to camera right (opposite the fill). Diffusion looks good -looks like you brought out a lot of texture detail, and it's easy to lose if the light isn't diffused well.
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Saul



Joined: 31 Jan 2011
Posts: 1008
Location: Naperville, IL USA

PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 11:56 am    Post subject: Re: Critter Reply with quote

rjlittlefield wrote:
Olympusman wrote:
Looks like a mite.

That was my first impression too, but it's not consistent with Tim's description of "approximately 1.5mm wide and perhaps 25-30mm long with "pinchers" on the end."

--Rik


Maybe https://bugguide.net/node/view/431283/bgimage ?

Like this ?
http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=30227&highlight=bark+beetle+larvae
http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=31258&highlight=bark+beetle+larvae
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tevans9129



Joined: 30 Nov 2017
Posts: 126
Location: TN

PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rjlittlefield wrote:
Interesting critter! Seems like the shape of the mouthparts should be distinctive, but I do not recognize them.

Well photographed -- looks like you have good control of your illumination and stacking now.

Any chance of showing us a whole-body shot, just to help with the ID?

--Rik


It seems to be getting better but I have a long way to go. As of now, my concentration is on the more technical aspects. Here is a 1:1 view of the critter taken with a Nikon 105 f/2.8 with pn11. Only tried to get an image that shows the critter.

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rjlittlefield
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 5:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the image.

Looks to me like Saul has the ID nailed. An interesting thing about these beetle larvae is that the sharp point on the tail are actually fixed in place, not capable of pinching despite their appearance. Surely they have some use, but I have no clue what it is.

--Rik


Last edited by rjlittlefield on Mon Jan 29, 2018 5:53 pm; edited 1 time in total
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tevans9129



Joined: 30 Nov 2017
Posts: 126
Location: TN

PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 5:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mawyatt wrote:
Great shot, nice detail & lighting. Looks like the styrofoam cup diffusers with the AC 300II strobes are working well Very Happy

That could be the leading monster in a sci fi movie, that is one scary critter Surprised

Best,


Thanks Mike, I am thankful that it is not the size of a gorilla.
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tevans9129



Joined: 30 Nov 2017
Posts: 126
Location: TN

PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dalantech wrote:
Actually I think that the dual light setup gave you some nice shadows and kept the critter from looking flat -a big problem with most stacks. Looks like you had a key light at the top and a fill to camera left. Might try getting the fill a little higher next time (if possible). Look for a way to deepen the shadows to camera right (opposite the fill). Diffusion looks good -looks like you brought out a lot of texture detail, and it's easy to lose if the light isn't diffused well.


You are correct about the two lights and their placement and thanks for the recommendation, I will try that on my next attempt. I appreciate all suggestions that will improve my images.
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Troels



Joined: 15 Feb 2016
Posts: 286
Location: Denmark, Engesvang

PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2018 1:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Elongated form, absense of big eyes, chisel-like jaws, all adaptations to a living in narrow, dark tubes. Tubes in wood would be my first guess.

In vertical tubes is is a nice thing to be able to lock yourself in a fixed position without using all your leg muscles. Twoo big spines on the tail could solve that problem. Perhaps they could also act as kind of defence against small predators from behind.

[edit jan 31.: corrected spelling error]
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Last edited by Troels on Wed Jan 31, 2018 3:58 am; edited 1 time in total
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BugEZ



Joined: 26 Mar 2011
Posts: 663
Location: Loves Park Illinois

PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2018 3:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Urogomphi appears to be the proper name for the rear horns. I did not find any discussion on-line about their function but suspect Troels idea of them providing a brace to resist sliding backward is correct.

Keith
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2018 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Troels wrote:
In vertical tubes is is a nice thing to be able to lock yourself in a fixed position without using all your leg muscles.

Good point, particularly for a wood eater which I presume needs to press its mandibles against the wood to get a decent bite.

--Rik
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