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Nyungwe national park: Rwanda

 
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pbertner



Joined: 02 Mar 2010
Posts: 916
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2018 1:10 pm    Post subject: Nyungwe national park: Rwanda Reply with quote

On location in Nyungwe national park:



Caterpillar with urticating hairs:



Toad:



Juvenile katydid:



Harvestman:



Hairy shelled snail:



Mosquito:



Cloud forest waterfall:



Thanks for looking and commenting,
Paul
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mawyatt



Joined: 22 Aug 2013
Posts: 1595
Location: Clearwater

PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2018 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paul,

Beautiful images Very Happy

Was that skeeter dinning on you Rolling Eyes

Best,
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Beatsy



Joined: 05 Jul 2013
Posts: 1376
Location: Malvern, UK

PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2018 2:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wonderful set of macros! What a location! Are these bugs and things just wandering around everywhere, or do you have to ferret around and hunt them out?
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JH



Joined: 09 Mar 2013
Posts: 1154
Location: Vallentuna, Stockholm, Sweden

PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2018 3:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting and nice - thanks for posting.
How dangerous are mosquito bites in this location? Here in Sweden they are common, annoying but harmles.
Best regards
Jörgen Hellberg
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pbertner



Joined: 02 Mar 2010
Posts: 916
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2018 6:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks JH, Beatsy and Mawyatt for the kind words.

JH - Malaria is endemic to Africa, not to mention filariasis and bunch of other vector borne pathogens, including the tse-tse fly communicated African sleeping sickness.

Beatsy - This particular national park is in the cloud forest and so quite cool compared to the lowlands. Temperature is often inversely proportional to diversity, and so I didn't find quite as much as I would have in the lowlands.

Mawyatt - Indeed it was!
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Lou Jost



Joined: 04 Sep 2015
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2018 8:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I especially liked the katydid, and the hairy-shelled snail. I don't recall ever seeing such a snail.
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 19245
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2018 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wonderful pictures, as always!

But what particularly caught my attention this time was a bit of the language.

Paul wrote "Malaria is endemic to Africa".

That prompted some confusion inside my head, so I looked up the official definition of "endemic".

According to Google search on "define endemic"
Quote:
adjective

1. (of a disease or condition) regularly found among particular people or in a certain area.
"areas where malaria is endemic"

2. (of a plant or animal) native or restricted to a certain country or area.
"a marsupial endemic to northeastern Australia"

In other words, the word "endemic" means two very different things, depending on whether you're talking about a disease or an organism.

Malaria as a disease is endemic in Africa (because it's regularly found there), but the malaria parasite is not endemic to Africa because it is also found in Asia and Latin America.

I am a native English speaker, but sometimes this language vexes me! Confused

--Rik
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Beatsy



Joined: 05 Jul 2013
Posts: 1376
Location: Malvern, UK

PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2018 10:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rjlittlefield wrote:

I am a native English speaker, but sometimes this language vexes me! Confused

Meanings can be vexing indeed. And then there's pronunciation - http://www.i18nguy.com/chaos.html

Perhaps doubly challenging for Muricans. "Aluminum"!? "Tomaydo"!? How quaint! Smile
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Pau
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Joined: 20 Jan 2010
Posts: 4466
Location: Valencia, Spain

PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2018 12:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

rjlittlefield wrote:
...
In other words, the word "endemic" means two very different things, depending on whether you're talking about a disease or an organism.
...

Different fields (Ecology vs Epidemiology) different meaning, although related. Not just English but a general issue.
What about objective, for example?
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Troels



Joined: 15 Feb 2016
Posts: 367
Location: Denmark, Engesvang

PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2018 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lou Jost wrote:
I especially liked the katydid, and the hairy-shelled snail. I don't recall ever seeing such a snail.


I was very surprised the first time I saw a hairy snail shell. In Europe we have a fairly common and widespread hairy snail. But very few besides the specialists are aware of it beceause of its small size (no more than 6 mm).

Hairy snail in UK

And I love the pictures from the rainforest.
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