www.photomacrography.net :: View topic - New to microscopy, need some direction
www.photomacrography.net Forum Index
An online community dedicated to the practices of photomacrography, close-up and macro photography, and photomicrography.
Photomacrography Front Page Amateurmicrography Front Page
Old Forums/Galleries
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
New to microscopy, need some direction

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Beginners Micro
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
F4



Joined: 12 Feb 2017
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2017 2:27 pm    Post subject: New to microscopy, need some direction Reply with quote

I am wanting to get into microscope photography and have a few questions.

I am wanting to get a trinocular microscope that has a good amount of features including polarization, DIC, phase contrast, darkfield, etc. and maybe fluorescence, if the technique is somehow different than simply shining UV light onto the specimen.

https://youtu.be/7su__qLf-Io
When looking at this video, the footage seems clear and the microscope used is a Nikon Optiphot 2, however I've noticed there are other Nikon microscopes on eBay that seem very similar to the Optiphot, these are:

Nikon Microphot
Nikon Diaphot (inverted microscope)
Nikon Labophot
Nikon Eclipse (seemed more expensive?)

Are these any better or worse (feature and image-quality wise) when compared to the Optiphot 2? All of them seem to sell for ~$800-$3000. I am open to a different brand of microscope as well, as long as it has features and is capable of having image quality better than or equal to the Optiphot, but after seeing that video it seems like the Nikon ones are the way to go. Ideally I would like to find something which costs no more than $1500, but I could potentially go over that depending on the reason. Optiphot 2 POL is what I will be keeping my eye out for unless someone says there is something better.

All of these Nikon microscopes are "compound microscopes" and not "stereo microscopes", correct?

I've noticed that the highest magnification objective that can be put on these Nikon microscopes go up to a max of 100x... are there other objectives that exist that can be put on these Nikon microscopes, such as 400x, 1000x, etc? Is the resolution/sharpness/clarity of the objectives good enough for a Nikon D810?

What technique was used to change the colors in the video? What is "P.A.C.O." ?

Will I need a special adapter to attach a Nikon DSLR? If so, what is it called?

How do these Nikon microscopes compare to the $300-$800 Amscope and OMAX microscopes being sold on Amazon?

Are certain parts required to enable certain techniques? For example:
Polarization requires two polarization filters fitted for the specific microscope
What specific parts are required to acheive DIC, phase contrast, and darkfield?
I ask this so that If the microscope I purchase off eBay does not come with a certain part, I will know what else to purchase in addition to the microscope to enable a certain technique.

Any answer to any question here will be appreciated!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ChrisR
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Mar 2009
Posts: 7255
Location: Near London, UK

PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2017 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome to the forum!
I see you haven't had a reply.
I'm no microscopist, but, you've asked questions which would take pages to answer fully.
The hardware is easy, if you have many, many thousands to throw at it. Otherwise it's a slow slog with much research. A fully kitted scope (or two) would likely still cost your budget a couple or four times over.
Then building knowledge to use it would take all my spare time for years. Then, I don't know much about the biology, so after 100 typical images, which would have cost maybe $100 apiece spread over the equipment, I'm not sure what I'd do with it.

I can only suggest you narrow your horizons, find something solid from one of Nikon, Olympus, Zeiss or Leitz, saleable for if your attitude changes either way, and read everything you can. Amscope may be OK, others will advise.
_________________
Chris R
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
zzffnn



Joined: 22 May 2014
Posts: 1487
Location: Texas USA

PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 5:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome to the forum.

I own Nikon Labophot 2 and is very familiar with Optiphot 2. Unless you can find O2 much cheaper, Olympus BH2 is a better choice. It is more modular, has better focus drive (more durable). L2 is less modular than O2 (for example, quick change objective turret is very rare for L2).

If I start again, I will get a Leitz or Zeiss 160 tube length microscope.

Yes, all major brands are better and have higher resale value than AmScope or Omax.

Modularity and free access to condenser iris/filter tray and objective back lens is important to illumination techniques.

PACO is a polarization device.

For camera connection, you can project image directly to sensor with some Nikon CFN objectives or other self-corrected optics. Otherwise, use afocal digiscoping adapter / camera over visual eyepiece.

There is some FAQ, forum articles and online articles about microscopy that you should read, before jumping into things like darkfield, phase contrast and DIC. Please search them.
_________________
Selling my inverted phase contrast 20x objective for petri dish peeking
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Ichthyophthirius



Joined: 07 Mar 2013
Posts: 729

PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 4:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi F4,

There's a lot of ground to cover Very Happy Before you buy anything, I would recommend more reading, at least a few weeks worth. Start with a microscopy textbook from your local library or with this classic guide:

www.science-info.net/docs/zeiss/Zeiss-Microscopy-from-the-very-Beginning.PDF
(probably the more relevant version for you since it depicts the traditional microscopes with 160 mm tube length)

www.well.ox.ac.uk/_asset/file/zeiss-guide-to-microscopy-from-the-very-begiining.pdf
(this is the modern version)

Then you need to decide what kind of objects you want to investigate (sounds like you're interested in "pond life").

In terms of buying strategy, the microscopes of all the large manufacturers (Zeiss, Leitz, Nikon, Olympus) and some of the smaller ones (Zeiss Jena, PZO, Reichert, B&L, etc.) are all capable, which one you choose is largely down to opportunity and personal preference. All manufacturerss have weaknesses and some components from any of them are rare and unreasonably expensive on the second-hand market.

If you have a microscope in good condition, 10 % of your success is down to your gear and 90 % to hard work and practice! I'd say you'll need 1-2 years to get good at what you're doing Wink

Find out if there is a microscopy club/society near where you live.

My recommendation would be to buy a second-hand microscope with 160/170 mm tube length from one of the large companies (Zeiss, Leitz, Nikon, Olympus) in good condition (again if you find a microscopy club, they will be able to test an Ebay-buy with you!) with trinocular head and preferably phase contrast.

Use the instrument for 1-2 years and find out what you really want to do with it, then use your new-found experience when looking for a larger stand with DIC and/or fluorescence. If you have lost interest along the way, you can always sell your first microscope with minimal financial loss (microscopes from the large manufacturers don't loose much value if you haven't overspent originally).

My personal recommendation is a Zeiss Standard (14, 16, 18, RA or WL) with trinocular head 70:30 and phase contrast condenser NA 0.9 or 1.4. They can also be fitted with DIC or fluorescence later. The Zeiss Standard system is exceptionally versatile and most parts come up on Ebay regularly. It is also relatively easy to use and a lot of information about it is available online.

Regards, Ichty
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Alan Wood



Joined: 29 Dec 2010
Posts: 239
Location: Near London, U.K.

PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ichty has given good advice, find an amateur-friendly club; there is a list of clubs here:
http://www.quekett.org/resources/links/clubs

To get familiar with options and accessories, there are lots of sites with downloadable brochures and manuals:
http://www.quekett.org/resources/links/manuals

If you are in the UK, Quekett excursions are relaxed events where members bring their microscopes, cameras and computers and are happy to talk about them. There are also events run by various clubs in the UK where used microscopes and accessories are available to examine and buy.

Alan Wood
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
F4



Joined: 12 Feb 2017
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What exactly needs to be placed between the Nikon F mount DSLR and the end of the Optiphot trinocular in order to attach the DSLR to the Optiphot?

Can a Nikon DSLR attach to an Olympus BH2 microscope?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Alan Wood



Joined: 29 Dec 2010
Posts: 239
Location: Near London, U.K.

PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 3:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For attaching an SLR to an Olympus BH-2, see this page:

http://www.alanwood.net/photography/olympus/digital-slr-bh2-microscope.html#cameraadapter

It might be possible to remove the OM mount from a Photomicro Adapter L and replace it with a Nikon F mount, but I do not know anyone who has tried it. Nikon F mounts that might be suitable are available on eBay, for example item number 401142718599.

Alan Wood
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ChrisR
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Mar 2009
Posts: 7255
Location: Near London, UK

PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The screw holes in those adapters are designed to align with "most" Olympus lenses. They don't fit extension tubes, etc. I suspect the chance of them fitting other things like microscope parts, is remote. Sad
_________________
Chris R
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
F4



Joined: 12 Feb 2017
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 9:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only thing that appears to be what I am looking for is http://www.martinmicroscope.com/product/mm-slr/ it is $500 and then I may also need to purchase an additional c mount adaptdr as well for another $500
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Crusty



Joined: 11 Dec 2016
Posts: 11
Location: Brooklyn, NY

PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2017 3:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have been using an inexpensive Nikon camera->Olympus microscope adapter which seems to work well enough.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B009OY8J6K/ref=sr_ph_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1488321936&sr=sr-1&keywords=microscope+camera+adapter
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Alan Wood



Joined: 29 Dec 2010
Posts: 239
Location: Near London, U.K.

PostPosted: Wed Mar 01, 2017 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

F4 wrote:
The only thing that appears to be what I am looking for is http://www.martinmicroscope.com/product/mm-slr/ it is $500 and then I may also need to purchase an additional c mount adaptdr as well for another $500


You definitely don't need to spend that much.

Look at this adapter:
http://www.truetex.com/olympus-38mm.htm

Or contact Martin Microscopes and ask about their MBH2T adapter (it is not on their website).

These adapters are replacements for the Olympus Photomicro Adapter L that use T-mounts and so will fit a Nikon SLR.

Alan Wood
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Beginners Micro All times are GMT - 7 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group