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Layers of rust
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
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Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2015 1:33 pm    Post subject: Layers of rust Reply with quote

I ran across this scene a few days ago and thought it was interesting in several aspects. Some of those were visual, some of them not.

As the title says, this is layers of rust. I'll share the "not" aspects after somebody guesses what the rusted thing was. Sad



Stereo pairs follow, crossed-eye.







Nikon D800E, Mitutoyo M Plan Apo 5X with Raynox 150 tube lens, extension slightly increased for better framing. Zerene Stacker PMax, synthetic stereo.

--Rik

Edit: corrected typo, "Raynox 105" --> "Raynox 150".


Last edited by rjlittlefield on Sat Mar 07, 2015 8:02 pm; edited 1 time in total
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abpho



Joined: 17 Aug 2011
Posts: 1423
Location: Earth

PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2015 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is this the thread of a screw/bolt?
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rjlittlefield
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2015 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is not. This thing was completely smooth when it was new, and there were no threaded components anywhere near this.

--Rik
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Beatsy



Joined: 05 Jul 2013
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Location: Malvern, UK

PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2015 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Damascus steel blade?
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ChrisR
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Joined: 14 Mar 2009
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Location: Near London, UK

PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2015 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can understand Beatsy's suggestion, with the appearance of something wrought, and possibly into layers by hand folding/hammering. But it looks SO irregular that I'm suggesting it's a piece of rock/iron ore.
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rjlittlefield
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2015 6:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beatsy, this piece was definitely not intended and never used for cutting.

ChrisR, it's definitely not a piece of rock or iron ore. Not likely to have been hand folded or hammered either, though I can't say for sure about that.

--Rik
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abpho



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PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2015 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Was it a magnet? Do they even rust?
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ChrisR
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2015 7:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Surfaces always tend to rust in flakes, because it forms in a layer then comes off because there's a volume increase, which raises stresses.

First I read "Raynox 105" as 105mm so quite thick flakes, but Raynox 150 would be 210mm so not so thick.
Thick rust, with quite thick flakes, makes me think the layering might be related to an internal structure of the original material. Like a forged leaf spring.
I've never studied rust though, it's not good for much!
I'll go for a forging or rolled piece rather than a straight casting. The layers are sometimes called "mechanical fibering". Cast thin sections can show it too though.
I dare say it would be possible to tell the difference between something rusted in a marine (salty) environment versus dry air, or underground, etc. One for Abby Sciuto.
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pontop



Joined: 18 Dec 2013
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Location: Uppsala, Sweden

PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 2:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The inside of that old focus block you are chopping up?

BTW when looking at the stereo pairs the grayish triangular part looks like it is placed wrong. To my eyes it looks like it is floating behind everything else.

/Bo
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rjlittlefield
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 2:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

pontop wrote:
To my eyes it looks like it is floating behind everything else.

These pairs are intended for cross-eyed viewing. You must be managing to fuse them parallel. If you want to do that, then pull them into StereoPhoto Maker and press the Swap Left/Right button.

Magnet, no.

Focus block, no.

Leaf spring, no.

Forged or rolled, probably. Smile

--Rik
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Picosvistas



Joined: 21 Jul 2013
Posts: 67
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 7:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Old disused railway track?
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Beatsy



Joined: 05 Jul 2013
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 7:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A file?
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rjlittlefield
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not railroad track, and not a file.

Not an antiquity, either. It is modern manufacture.

An odd fact that may also be a hint: this was a key supporting component in a piece of equipment that was fully functional and used several times daily until 3 days ago, when I replaced it for fear of imminent and catastrophic failure.

--Rik
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Bill Eldridge



Joined: 23 May 2013
Posts: 161
Location: Richmond, Virginia, USA

PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is it vehicular in nature?
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rjlittlefield
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 12:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not vehicular. The "catastrophic failure" would have been only a matter of the equipment falling apart in place. No injuries would have resulted, and little if any property damage. Come to think of it, the equipment probably would have continued to be functional, despite collapsing. Confused

--Rik
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