A single maple flower

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rjlittlefield
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A single maple flower

Post by rjlittlefield »

Image

Spring must be coming -- my maple tree is blooming!

--Rik

Bruce Williams
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Post by Bruce Williams »

A welcome harbinger of warmer days to come (and more things to photograph) :D

You've achieved both artistic and technical excellence with this bi-colour study Rik. Levels and colour saturation are spot on and the out of focus stamens at back nicely accentuate the three dimensional nature of the subject.

Bruce

Ken Ramos
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Post by Ken Ramos »

Wow, pretty neat there Rik. Looks sort of like what I got in my front yard. Maybe it's a maple. :D

MacroLuv
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Post by MacroLuv »

Masterfully done, Rik! :D
I'm just curious about F-stop, actually magnification (x:1), amount of applied sharpening and flash usage?
I would be in temptation to clone out one black and few white spots from this beauty. O:)
The meaning of beauty is in sharing with others.

P.S.
Noticing of my "a" and "the" and other grammar
errors are welcome. :D

Mike B in OKlahoma
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Post by Mike B in OKlahoma »

This is gorgeous!

I too am such a gadget geek that I am moved beyond artistic admiration to wonder about the technicals. I am SUCH a Philistine! :oops:
Mike Broderick
Oklahoma City, OK, USA

Constructive critiques of my pictures, and reposts in this forum for purposes of critique are welcome

"I must obey the inscrutable exhortations of my soul....My mandate includes weird bugs."
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rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

Thanks, guys! :D

I'm always surprised by what these flowers look like up close. Even when you have some in hand, they're pretty "blah" until you haul out the magnifying glass. Then they're, well, what you see here!

Ken, I'm not sure what your flowers are. Every time I go to the east coast, I'm impressed that I do not recognize most of the trees! I guess we'll know in a few months. If yours has maple-shaped leaves and makes those little winged seeds, maybe it's a maple? :D

Nikola, Bruce, and Mike, see this technical description over in the Technique forum. O:)

--Rik

crotermund
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Post by crotermund »

This picture is beautiful, Rik. You, Bruce, and others have certainly inspired me to investigate the stacking technique. Is it pretty time consuming to complete a single photograph using this technique? I know it is worth it in the end after seeing what you do, but I am curious.
Craig Rotermund
Canon 30D
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beetleman
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Post by beetleman »

Very Beautiful picture Rik. The colors are fantastic :shock:
Take Nothing but Pictures--Leave Nothing but Footprints.
Doug Breda

rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

crotermund wrote:Is it pretty time consuming to complete a single photograph using this technique?
Doing the first few takes a long time. At this point, I have equipment and procedures that make stacking pretty painless. For this picture, I spent much more time in specimen prep and getting the final image polished for posting, than I did in shooting and processing the stack. It's quick enough that for a static subject, I will seldom choose not to stack.

--Rik
Last edited by rjlittlefield on Sun Mar 11, 2007 11:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

beetleman wrote:Very Beautiful picture Rik. The colors are fantastic :shock:
I agree, they are! But I had nothing to do with the colors except make them big enough to see. These are straight off the tree. :shock:

--Rik

rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

crotermund wrote:Is it pretty time consuming to complete a single photograph using this technique?
Craig, I looked at the timestamps on the various image files.

Turns out to have been just under 10 minutes from first frame in the stack to being done with Helicon Focus. Actually shooting the stack was only 88 seconds for all 30 frames. (They go pretty fast at low magnification where there's plenty of light, large steps turning the screw, and no worries about vibration.) So that's the stacking cost -- 10 minutes.

In contrast, the total time futzing around with specimen prep, lighting, trial images, more specimen prep, wrestling with positioning, still more specimen prep (yes, there's a pattern here...), then post-processing and eventually posting, was more like 3 hours.

If I were faster at all the other stuff, maybe I'd be less fond of stacking. :-k :D

--Rik

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