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Happy New Year

 
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Fredlab



Joined: 09 Nov 2012
Posts: 304
Location: Burgundy

PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2013 1:36 am    Post subject: Happy New Year Reply with quote

Hello

Since 2007 i made with flash an animated greeting card.
(only slide show... i'm not informatician)

This year, my card was made with microphotographic shots.
http://www.phonat.fr/annee/voeux2013.html

Without the forum of "Le Naturaliste" or "photomacrography.net", this card could not be done.
This card is also a thank you to all members who participate in this forum, giving advice without counting.

Enjoy.
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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2013 2:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks very much. Very enjoyable. Some of the suggested indentities of the images are hillarious. Very Happy (No matter than they are in French. They translate very well!).

Harold
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Chris S.
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Joined: 05 Apr 2009
Posts: 3041
Location: Ohio, USA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2013 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fred, I enjoyed your greeting card, and also your Flickr site. Beautiful work, and with quite a variety of subjects, optical regimes, and lighting approaches.

Your duckweed (Lemna sp.--lentille d'eau) stoma is lovely! It's especially interesting to me as I've been photographing stomata recently, and even had it in mind to try duckweed stomata next. At your Flickr stream, you list "Olympus BH2 + objectif Olympus DApo 40/1,3" as the equipment for this image. Having no knowledge of Olympus objectives, I'm wondering--was this taken with water immersion? (I actually received a book on stomatal physiology for Christmas, which I much appreciate--something that probably marks me as officially weird.)

It was interesting to note on your Flickr stream that you have been using, with good results, a variety of optics as "tube lenses" with Mitutoyo objectives. These include a Besseler Apo 240mm (used in your image of a tick) and a "doublet Surplus Shed (morfanon like)" (used in your image of sporangia). I suspect that some here would be interested in knowing more about this doublet. It would also be interesting to hear your views on the various "tube lenses" you've worked with.

Cheers,

--Chris
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Fredlab



Joined: 09 Nov 2012
Posts: 304
Location: Burgundy

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 2:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello

Thanks for your messages.

Chris : i'm not microscopy specialist - i spend time to test some optics for finding good objectives.
Olympus DApo 40/1,3 is less expensive than the PlanApo (but i demanded to Santas the dry one - 40/0,95 - he didn't hear me). This lens is the best i have.
I didn't use it in water immersion... only oil (and with diatom, i place oil upon and under the slide). With Protozoa (?), i think immersion is sometime not suitable.

I'm happy to learn the english name of Lemna.
here is a shot taken with an SPlan 10


(real size - here)

for this note
Quote:
(I actually received a book on stomatal physiology for Christmas, which I much appreciate--something that probably marks me as officially weird.)

we can say : without stomas, superior plants (with root, stem and leaves) can't exist

About stomas again, you can uplaod the original size of the picture taken with the DApo 40 here and if I can give advice is to consider using nail polish (vernis à ongles)


(stomas of inferior epidermis - Ilex leaf - SPlan 10x - DIC & stack original size - here)

For "morfanon" vs Besseler or another tube lens, I plan to create some thread to talk ... for now, these tests are reported in the forum "Le Naturalist". I can post the links...
If you are patient and i you support my horrible english, these tests will be posted in "photomacrography.net"

C'est juste un retour des choses.
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Chris S.
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Joined: 05 Apr 2009
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Location: Ohio, USA

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 1:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fred, thanks for the additional images. Formidable!

I was shooting my stomata subjects in air, without cover slide, mounting agents such fingernail polish, or immersion, in order to observe them opening and closing as they do in normal function. One surprise to me was that when the stomata opened, they released small jets of gas that moved the leaf to a degree that was untenable at 100x magnification. This was easy to remedy by more firmly securing the leaf, but startled me at first. In retrospect, does not seem so strange.

Your English is not at all horrible, and is quite effective at communicating your work and findings. For my tube lens, I am quite happy with the Mitutoyo MT-1, but you have experimented with some tube lenses that I believe have not been reported on here, so I think your impressions would be of interest to many.

Cheers,

--Chris
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Fredlab



Joined: 09 Nov 2012
Posts: 304
Location: Burgundy

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello

Chris S. wrote:
(...) One surprise to me was that when the stomata opened, they released small jets of gas that moved the leaf to a degree that was untenable at 100x magnification. This was easy to remedy by more firmly securing the leaf, but startled me at first. In retrospect, does not seem so strange.


wow... your observation is really interesting ... I really want to see it
it's no strange because plants are breathing and water vapor exits through the stomata which allows to mount the raw sap... when stomatas are closed (full sun...), nothing travels in the plant ... it is useless to water at midday.

Chris S. wrote:
For my tube lens, I am quite happy with the Mitutoyo MT-1, but you have experimented with some tube lenses that I believe have not been reported on here, so I think your impressions would be of interest to many.


This thread is explicit enough ?
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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
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Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2013 12:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fredlab wrote:
it's no strange because plants are breathing and water vapor exits through the stomata

The classic theory is that this is by diffusion, which would not be expected to cause visible movement.

Harold
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Chris S.
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Joined: 05 Apr 2009
Posts: 3041
Location: Ohio, USA

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2013 12:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harold, in the specimens I photographed, the guard cells of the stomata opened suddenly and dramatically, and there appeared to be substantial back-pressure of gas behind them, which burst forth sharply and in jet-like fashion. This surprised me. Since my observations occurred just prior to our first killing frost, I brought specimens of the plants inside and have them growing under lights to permit winter study--and they are just now reaching a level of vigor where I feel I can work with them again. Hence my interest in furthering my book-learning of stomatal physiology.

It would be grand fun to obtain a high-speed video-camera, hook it to the Bratcam, and record this activity. I've repeatedly seen it with my eyes, but have no proper record of it.

But thinking about it, the guard cells seem to operate based on osmotic pressure. Why shouldn't gaseous pressure accumulate within the leaf structure before osmotic pressure opens the guard cells? (Caveat that I have so far read very little of the stomatal physiology book, and may have significant misconceptions on how stomata operate.)

Cheers,

--Chris
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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2013 1:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chris S. wrote:
But thinking about it, the guard cells seem to operate based on osmotic pressure. Why shouldn't gaseous pressure accumulate within the leaf structure before osmotic pressure opens the guard cells?

That seems a good hypotheses.

Seriously, do not discount sound also being emitted but requiring very sensitive detection equipment.

[Edit] I just found this:

http://www.ndt.net/article/ewgae2012/content/papers/79_Rosner_Rev1.pdf

(Nothing so far on sound from opening).

[Edit ends]

Harold
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Fredlab



Joined: 09 Nov 2012
Posts: 304
Location: Burgundy

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2013 2:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello

Harold Gough wrote:
Fredlab wrote:
it's no strange because plants are breathing and water vapor exits through the stomata

The classic theory is that this is by diffusion, which would not be expected to cause visible movement.


I agree - but my english is so bad Embarassed - in "breathing", i want to say that plants makes (?) exchanges with atmosphere... not directly - diffusion with internal atmosphere (spongy mesophyll - i try this name in this site) and then, diffusion between internal atmosphere / exterior - this diffusion is controled by the stomatas, that they works by osmotic pressure (internal of guard cells).
I think movements of stomatas don't depend of gas pressure... that was a reason what I said the observartion of Chris was really intersting.

I don't know if the books of Francis Hallé are translated in english, but "Eloge de la plante" is "on the top" of my bookcase.
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