Slime Mould Lycogala epidendrum

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Harold Gough
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Slime Mould Lycogala epidendrum

Post by Harold Gough »

This was growing in the same habitat as the Candle Snuff fungi, in a beech wood, on rotten beech logs. I shot various possible slime moulds. This, the only successful image, I thought was a fungus (Bulgaria type). :roll:

I am advised that it is Lycogala epidendrum.

The beech leaf Fagus sylvaticus gives the scale:

Image

This crop shows the main area of interest:

Image

Slime moulds are in the Amoebozoa group:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amoebozoa

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slime_moulds

See also links in our FAQs.

Harold
Last edited by Harold Gough on Wed Dec 28, 2011 1:52 am, edited 2 times in total.
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.

Cyclops
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Post by Cyclops »

So there are white fungi here and the small yellow objects are the slime moulds?
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Harold Gough
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Post by Harold Gough »

Cyclops wrote:So there are white fungi here and the small yellow objects are the slime moulds?
No. It is all stages of the slime mould. If you look at the link you will see a pretty pink stage of the large, spheroid bodies, which was not present.

http://www.biopix.info/lycogala-epidend ... 84322.aspx

Pretty, isn't it?:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/snappysnapper/5870709026/

Here is a schitzophrenic one:

http://wildflowers.perverdonk.com/Mushr ... _frame.htm

Harold
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.

Cyclops
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Post by Cyclops »

Oh so i may have seen some already!
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Harold Gough
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Post by Harold Gough »

Cyclops wrote:Oh so i may have seen some already!
Or you have Cramp Balls, various Daldinia spp

http://www.northamptonshirewildlife.co. ... ntrica.jpg

Harold
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.

Cyclops
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Post by Cyclops »

Harold Gough wrote:
Cyclops wrote:Oh so i may have seen some already!
Or you have Cramp Balls, various Daldinia spp

http://www.northamptonshirewildlife.co. ... ntrica.jpg

Harold
Harold, Im sure Ive photographed such on a dead tree stump!
Canon 30D | Canon IXUS 265HS | Cosina 100mm f3.5 macro | EF 75-300 f4.5-5.6 USM III | EF 50 f1.8 II | Slik 88 tripod | Apex Practicioner monocular microscope

Harold Gough
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Post by Harold Gough »

Larry,

I'm not disputing it, just mentioning a similar alternative.

Harold
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Cyclops
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Post by Cyclops »

Harold Gough wrote:Larry,

I'm not disputing it, just mentioning a similar alternative.

Harold
Oh I know, I was just saying the pic in that link reminded me of one I photographed and thought was a fungus. Ill find the photo to show you.
Canon 30D | Canon IXUS 265HS | Cosina 100mm f3.5 macro | EF 75-300 f4.5-5.6 USM III | EF 50 f1.8 II | Slik 88 tripod | Apex Practicioner monocular microscope

Harold Gough
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Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 2:17 am
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

Post by Harold Gough »

The mould was found again on Christmas Eve. This time I used a tripod, exposure times longer than one second being indicated at ISO 400, with the Olympus 35mm macro 4/3 AF on the E-P2. I set 8 seconds anti-shock delay and used AF.

The coloured bodies are a few mm across.

0.5 second f7

Image

The remainder are crops of further images taken from increasingly closer distances.

1 second f8 (the black spheroid object is an old one of the orange structures).

Image


1.6 seconds f10

Image

2 seconds f11

Image

These pictures, especially the last, suggest that this is the Wolf's Milk Slime Lycogala epidendrum, so-called because of the form of the sporangium resembling a wolf's mammary gland. It is also called the Toothpaste Slime because the young forms, not shown here, contain pink paste.

Harold
Last edited by Harold Gough on Sun Aug 05, 2012 3:50 am, edited 1 time in total.
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.

Harold Gough
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Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 2:17 am
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

Post by Harold Gough »

Having photographed the organism looking rather good on Christmas Eve, I was wondering, on Boxing Day morning, whether I could do better. However, it was now starting to dry out at the end of this active period.

All images have ben cropped by up to about 70% to exclude large areas of surrounding dead wood, devoid of slime mould:

Image

Image

Image

A small portion, further down the log, and not quite so mature.

Image

The hardware was the same as for the previous set and the exposures were similar.

I have found the 35mm macro lens and its AF, as useful here as I found it hopeless for active live insects.

Harold
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.

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