Lichen on wooden fence (images added)

Images of undisturbed subjects in their natural environment. All subject types.

Moderators: Pau, rjlittlefield, ChrisR, Chris S.

rjlittlefield
Site Admin
Posts: 21400
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:34 am
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA
Contact:

Lichen on wooden fence (images added)

Post by rjlittlefield »

Image

Frame width about 35 mm.

Shot with Canon T1i, Sigma 105 mm f/2.8 macro lens at 1:1.5, natural light at 1/5 second and f/9 using Live View with EFSC, 23 frames shot with StackShot at 1.10 mm focus step, stacked with Zerene Stacker PMax, no retouching. Slight underexposure plus curves adjustment to bring out the colors and textures.

Here is the physical setup:

Image Image

I tried shooting the little orange lichen at the right at 3X and 0.040 mm focus step, but it turned out that the fence was swaying back and forth too much for that. The stack ended up looking like it had been shot substantially in random order, and I had to throw out too many frames due to motion blur.

--Rik

Edit: title to add images
Last edited by rjlittlefield on Thu Feb 10, 2011 6:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

LordV
Posts: 1571
Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2007 10:28 am
Location: UK

Post by LordV »

Came out well Rik :)

You might have been better off taking them as I would have done, resting the end of the lens on the same fence rail - at least that minimises relative movement :)
Brian v.
www.flickr.com/photos/lordv
canon20D,350D,40D,5Dmk2, sigma 105mm EX, Tamron 90mm, canon MPE-65

rjlittlefield
Site Admin
Posts: 21400
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:34 am
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA
Contact:

Post by rjlittlefield »

I went back and took another run at the small lichen. This time I went equipped with flash and a better understanding of what was likely to go wrong. Worked out very nicely!

This is about 5.1 mm field width, cropped from a 3X image on a 22.3 mm sensor. MP-E 65 at f/4.0, 70 frames at 0.040 mm focus step. ISO 100, Canon 580EX II Speedlite at 1/64 power.

Image

Here is a crop at 70% of actual pixels.

Image

And just to fill in about the setup:

Image

The lichen shown above is the little orange thing at image center here:

Image

--Rik

Edit: add technical info about flash.
Last edited by rjlittlefield on Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Craig Gerard
Posts: 2877
Joined: Sat May 01, 2010 1:51 am
Location: Australia

Post by Craig Gerard »

Interesting Rik!

Just noticed you've added some additional setup pics. :)


Craig
To use a classic quote from 'Antz' - "I almost know exactly what I'm doing!"

rjlittlefield
Site Admin
Posts: 21400
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:34 am
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA
Contact:

Post by rjlittlefield »

LordV wrote:Came out well Rik :)
Thanks, Brian.
LordV wrote:You might have been better off taking them as I would have done, resting the end of the lens on the same fence rail - at least that minimises relative movement :)
Yep, I thought about that, and if I had wanted a short stack, probably that's what I would have done.

But I really wanted a deep high resolution stack, and I couldn't figure out a good quick way of stabilizing the rail or tripod against the fence. Lag bolts came to mind, but I don't own the fence and this is kind of a public area.

However, it turns out that the bulk of my problem was due to traffic. The fence runs perpendicular to a major street that's located about 50 feet behind me as I stood photographing the tripod. Every time a car goes by, the fence drifts from its neutral upright position to lean toward the car as it approaches, then back past neutral the other way to lean toward the car as it goes away, then finally back to neutral again as the car disappears into the distance. Next car, the same thing happens. It's not so bad when there's just one car, but the first time I tried this, I happened to pick the start of rush hour! Today I got luckier and happened to pick a quiet time, when the movements were both less extreme and obviously related to vehicles. I'm always surprised by what all can go wrong!

For curiosity, I shot a series of "fixed" pictures maybe 1/2 second apart as a few cars went by, then ran them through Zerene Stacker as if they were a stack. Here is what ZS had to say about image alignment:

Image

--Rik

Pau
Site Admin
Posts: 5368
Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 8:57 am
Location: Valencia, Spain

Post by Pau »

Rik, excellent photos and very interesting technical details.

You are going to end building a canon-zerene based seismometer to detect microseismic movements! :)
Pau

Harold Gough
Posts: 5786
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 2:17 am
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

Post by Harold Gough »

The white lichen is possible a Physcia and the orange one may be a Xanthoria. In both cases the resemblance may be superficial.

Here is a new website with pictures:

http://www.sharnoffphotos.com/lichens/l ... index.html

which I will add to the FAQ topic.

Harold
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.

rjlittlefield
Site Admin
Posts: 21400
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:34 am
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA
Contact:

Post by rjlittlefield »

Thanks for the comments, folks!

Pau, you just reminded me of an experience from many years ago, when as a project in high school shop class I built a small seismograph. It was fun to watch, but nowhere near as sensitive as this new "accidental invention".

Harold, thanks for the links & for extending the FAQ.

Craig, I was torn about putting too much setup stuff here in the image gallery. Eventually I decided to keep all the info together here instead of splitting it between image gallery and technical discussion forum. Part being friendly to the reader and part laziness, I am afraid! :)

--Rik

ChrisLilley
Posts: 674
Joined: Sat May 01, 2010 6:12 am
Location: Nice, France (I'm British)

Post by ChrisLilley »

Rik, if it helps you feel better the setup photos also give an impression of the habitat and sizing of the main subjects, so can be justified on non-technical grounds 8)

rjlittlefield
Site Admin
Posts: 21400
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:34 am
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA
Contact:

Post by rjlittlefield »

I finally got around to rendering out a stereo version of the small lichen.

Image

Zerene Stacker synthetic stereo, DMap, +-3%, with a bit of retouching from Stack Selected and cloning in Photoshop to clean up the background.

--Rik

Harold Gough
Posts: 5786
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 2:17 am
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

Post by Harold Gough »

It worked very well.

Lichens are one of the few subjects that, if you want to, can be revisited a year later to find the structure has little or no change in sizeor shape. Clearly, Zerene allows a stereo pair to be created from a single stack without that revisit.

Harold
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.

ChrisR
Site Admin
Posts: 8602
Joined: Sat Mar 14, 2009 3:58 am
Location: Near London, UK

Post by ChrisR »

A surprisingly pretty little thing. Even I should be able to find some of those. It's spring so I ventured to the shrubbery, but after an hour on hands and knees I'd found nothing to trouble the shutter.

Rik I noticed the thread started with a Sigma 105 macro, and know you have a Canon 100L now. Do you see much of a difference between them?

rjlittlefield
Site Admin
Posts: 21400
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:34 am
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA
Contact:

Post by rjlittlefield »

Thanks for the comments, guys. I'm taking this image to a meeting of nature photographers next weekend. I suspect this will be way outside most of the stuff they're used to.
ChrisR wrote: I noticed the thread started with a Sigma 105 macro, and know you have a Canon 100L now. Do you see much of a difference between them?
The Canon 100 L is much sharper and is more convenient to use because of its internal focusing. This particular Sigma 105 was purchased in 2004 and is the older non-DG design. I have no experience with the newer DG Sigmas.

--Rik

Craig Gerard
Posts: 2877
Joined: Sat May 01, 2010 1:51 am
Location: Australia

Post by Craig Gerard »

Rik wrote:I finally got around to rendering out a stereo version of the small lichen.
I finally got around to purchasing a stereoscopic viewer...what an amazing difference. :shock:


Craig
To use a classic quote from 'Antz' - "I almost know exactly what I'm doing!"

rjlittlefield
Site Admin
Posts: 21400
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:34 am
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA
Contact:

Post by rjlittlefield »

Craig Gerard wrote:I finally got around to purchasing a stereoscopic viewer...what an amazing difference. :shock:
Excellent -- I can always tell when stereo locks up for a new person by when they say "Oh!"

Which viewer did you end up getting?

--Rik

Post Reply Previous topicNext topic