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Dragonfly Eggs

 
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svalley



Joined: 03 Dec 2006
Posts: 288
Location: Albany, Oregon

PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 4:23 pm    Post subject: Dragonfly Eggs Reply with quote

These are the eggs of the dragonfly Aeshna palmata, 25 days since oviposition. The brownish circular area near the bottom is the eye starting to form. The ommatidia in the eyes are starting to be visible. My plan is to follow the full development of the eggs and also get stills and video of the pronymph hatching and the development of the nymph.



Darkfield lighting, Nikon D810, 10x Mitutoyo M Plan APO mounted on a 200mm Micro-Nikkor, f5.6 ISO 64, flash, 72 exposures stacked PMax in Zerene Stacker.
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Steve Valley - Albany, Oregon
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BugEZ



Joined: 26 Mar 2011
Posts: 693
Location: Loves Park Illinois

PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very interesting subject and study! Thanks for sharing.

Would it be possible to make a stereo pair? With 75 images it might be interesting.

Keith
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JH



Joined: 09 Mar 2013
Posts: 1090
Location: Vallentuna, Stockholm, Sweden

PostPosted: Sat Nov 11, 2017 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting project, and pictures.

Best regards Jörgen Hellberg
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Troels



Joined: 15 Feb 2016
Posts: 319
Location: Denmark, Engesvang

PostPosted: Sat Nov 11, 2017 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks! I will follow this.
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svalley



Joined: 03 Dec 2006
Posts: 288
Location: Albany, Oregon

PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2018 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Top is a lateral view of an egg on day 96 since oviposition. Note that the embryo has gone through katatrepsis where it flips ends so that it can hatch through the pointed end. The legs and thoracic and abdominal segments are clearly visible.

Bottom is a dorsal view at day 100. This egg hatched the next day. There is no synchronization in the development of the several hundred eggs in this clutch. They all were in diapause (interrupted development) for more than a month. The eggs that are outside (about half) are still in diapause. Katatrepsis which takes 10-12 hours occurs at random times and then development continues for about 2 more weeks before hatching.

Shot with a Nikon D810, Miyutoyo M Plan 20x mounted on a Micro-Nikkor 200mm, stacked with Zerene.



A dorsal view of the nymph 5 days after hatching. Same setup as above with an Mitutoyo M Plan 10x.



A ventral view of the same nymph. Note the labium folded back under the head and thorax. Same setup as above.


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Steve Valley - Albany, Oregon
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Troels



Joined: 15 Feb 2016
Posts: 319
Location: Denmark, Engesvang

PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2018 2:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent and interesting!
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BugEZ



Joined: 26 Mar 2011
Posts: 693
Location: Loves Park Illinois

PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 1:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I presume these are in a Petri dish? How do wou get them/ it to hold still for a stack?

Very interesting series!

Keith
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svalley



Joined: 03 Dec 2006
Posts: 288
Location: Albany, Oregon

PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BugEZ wrote:
I presume these are in a Petri dish? How do wou get them/ it to hold still for a stack?


Keith, these were shot in a well slide with a coverslip. The nymph had died recently so it made a good subject.

I have not had good luck shooting stacked subjects in a petri dish.

Steve
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svalley



Joined: 03 Dec 2006
Posts: 288
Location: Albany, Oregon

PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 3:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A closer dorsal view shot with a Mitutoyo 20x. Note the tubercles with spines behind the eyes. I have not seen them before on any other species, function unknown.



A ventral view showing a little better detail in the prehensile labium. It is mostly transparent making it difficult see. The nymph rapidly extends the labium to grasp prey using a pair of movable hooks at the anterior end.


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BugEZ



Joined: 26 Mar 2011
Posts: 693
Location: Loves Park Illinois

PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

svalley wrote
Quote:
shot in a well slide with a coverslip...


Thanks for the info. I am looking for ways to document the subterranean life of some fly larva but hope not to kill them. Not sure if I can persuade them to stay close to the glass walls of the tiny enclosure I plan to build...

Keith
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Sumguy01



Joined: 28 Jan 2013
Posts: 1085
Location: Ketchikan Alaska USA

PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very nice.
Interesting.
Thanks for sharing.
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