www.photomacrography.net :: View topic - Close-up Bees & Butterflies Enjoying Lavender nectar
www.photomacrography.net Forum Index
An online community dedicated to the practices of photomacrography, close-up and macro photography, and photomicrography.
Photomacrography Front Page Amateurmicrography Front Page
Old Forums/Galleries
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Close-up Bees & Butterflies Enjoying Lavender nectar

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Nature Photography -- Macro and Close-up
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
LVF



Joined: 23 Apr 2017
Posts: 66
Location: Sequim, Washington

PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 10:50 am    Post subject: Close-up Bees & Butterflies Enjoying Lavender nectar Reply with quote

After my post (Aug. 8th) on the resolving power of the Nikkor 300mm f/4E PF lens and attached Nikon 17E II Teleconverter lens, mounted on a Nikon D500 camera, I stopped doing indoor resolution chart testing. Instead, for the first time since I purchased this equipment, I took this Nikon camera and lenses out of my house to photograph the outdoors.

I went out to my back porch and sat down in an outdoor cushioned chair under an umbrella on a sunny afternoon, and relaxed with my camera in my lap.



In front of me were my lavender plants about 5 feet away.



I watched many bees busy gathering and eating pollen from the tiny lavender florets. The bees were quickly moving from one floret to another floret, mostly staying no more than a second or two on each floret, looking for pollen. Joining the bees were a few Pacific Northwest Skipper butterflies also seeking lavender nectar.

I raised my camera to my eye and tried to capture these fleeting bees and butterflies. The hit rate was low because the bees and butterflies were moving very fast.

Here are a couple of female worker honey bees with their jaw mandible in the floret collecting pollen.





Here are a few photographs of Pacific Northwest Skipper butterflies with their proboscis sucking nectar out of the lavender florets.









I was able to get more butterflies because they did not skip as fast.

Leon
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 18237
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2017 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This looks like a pleasant afternoon, and you got some good images to boot. Nice natural appearance in this set, no obvious artifacts from sharpening or noise reduction.

Going after active subjects at 5 feet is not a simple task! The hit rate is always low, so no surprises there.

Can you share some specifics about how you did it? I'm thinking high ISO, fast shutter speed, auto focus? Any support for the camera, or purely hand-held?

--Rik
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
LVF



Joined: 23 Apr 2017
Posts: 66
Location: Sequim, Washington

PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 11:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for your comments.

All Photos were taken hand held as I sat in the chair. I braced my left arm against my side and held the lens with my left hand. I continually pressed the AF-ON button to AF the camera as I search the lavender plants for the bees and butterflies.

I had set the D500 camera to ISO 2000 so that the shutter speed varied between 1/2000sec to 1/3200 sec. depending on whether the area was sun lite or in shadows. I set the lens to f/8 so the depth of field was shallow. That resulted in the smooth background even though there were many branches of lavender in the background.

I used Camera Raw CS6 to removed the noise in the photo (ISO 2000 did produce a slightly noisy photo). I slightly sharpen the photo in CR, setting the sharpening to 25 and no higher (lesson learned). I did these settings at a magnification of 200% and look over the whole photo as I did so. The D500 file, at ISO 2000, responded nicely to noise reduction.

I did no processing the Photoshop CS6, only use it to crop the photo and "save for web".

Leon
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
MarkSturtevant



Joined: 21 Nov 2015
Posts: 273

PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like these pictures, and even more importantly, you enjoyed making and sharing these pictures. Well done!
_________________
Mark Sturtevant
Dept. of Still Waters
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LVF



Joined: 23 Apr 2017
Posts: 66
Location: Sequim, Washington

PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Mark

It is an enjoyable hobby. As is playing with Photoshop. I plan to play with the last photo of the butterfly to see what variations I can produce in photoshop. Just having fun.

Leon
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Nature Photography -- Macro and Close-up All times are GMT - 7 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group