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objective lens purchase...

 
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eric dolphy



Joined: 14 Jul 2017
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 12:35 am    Post subject: objective lens purchase... Reply with quote

goal: adapt to Nikon D7000 for image capture--primarily insect study...

here are some ebay options:

Nikon Microscope Objective E Plan 10X / 0.25 LWD 160/-

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Nikon-Microscope-Objective-E-Plan-10X-0-25-LWD-160-W-Box-NR-/382161321057


Nikon Microscope Objective 10X / 0.3 W 160/- #110051

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Nikon-Microscope-Objective-10X-0-3-W-160-110051-w-Box-Case-NR-/382161323989



Nikon Plan 10x /0.25 160/- Ph1 DLL Phase Contrast Microscope Objective Lens

https://www.ebay.com/p/Nikon-E-Plan-10x-0-25-160-Ph-1-DL-Microscope-Objective-Lens-Ph1-Phase-Contrast/1550410264?iid=122593034617



adapting to Nikon D7000 APSC...

please spend a moment to clarify why one of the above is more suited to the stated goal...

thank you...
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JH



Joined: 09 Mar 2013
Posts: 946
Location: Vallentuna, Stockholm, Sweden

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 2:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Eric
If you are interested in 10x lenses, there is an interesting test done here where You can see some test pictures with the 10x LWD compared with other 10x lenses;
http://macrosmuymacros.com/index.php/en/comparative/10x-full-frame-test

The 10 0.3 W is a water dipping lens, I have the 4x and it is quite fun to use in water.
http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=160757#160757

The Ph lens is an older one – that I have no experience of.

My story is that I started with a CF 10x 0.3 and after a while bought a BD 0,25. They can give you hi resolution pictures.
http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=23481

Spending too much time “fighting” chromatic aberration I bought a Mitutoyo 10x:
http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=191096#191096

I do not know if you have a 4x or 5x lens. If you do not I recommend it. As a matter of fact, I use 4x or 5x much more than 10x.
http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=192096#192096
http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=33389
http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=211074#211074

Hope you find a lens you like, best regards Jörgen
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eric dolphy



Joined: 14 Jul 2017
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 2:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks, Jörgen...


bit by bit I am assembling a reasonably accurate 'picture' of the why and the wherefore of this scientific pursuit...

my sense of the matter is that Rik's excellent tutorial on attaching an objective to a DSLR could do with a (lack of better term) 'cheat sheet'...

for example, what I've gleaned thus far is that an objective with the infinity marking requires the extension tube apparatus--to replicate the microscope configuration it was designed for...

whereas an objective without the infinity mark is--what?--attached directly to the front of the DSLR (someone at that thread asked about the pros and cons of each, without a response)...

at any rate, your insights here cleared away the fog that much more--almost there!

getting started is not that daunting a task--just need to work at it for a few days as questions occur...hopefully others will chime in here with their own empirical data (learning from experience/experiment)...

Best,


E.
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ChrisR
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Joined: 14 Mar 2009
Posts: 7262
Location: Near London, UK

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

for example, what I've gleaned thus far is that an objective with the infinity marking requires the extension tube apparatus--to replicate the microscope configuration it was designed for...

whereas an objective without the infinity mark is--what?--attached directly to the front of the DSLR (someone at that thread asked about the pros and cons of each, without a response)...

No - "infinite" means you need an intermediate lens focused at infinity, "finite" means you just need a couple of sets of cheap tubes.

There's no concise best answer, it depends on requirements, what you already may have, etc.
Of course the more you spend the more options you get.
Using the objectives mentioned in the "where can I get " FAQ , at 4x and 10x, plus some tubes, will get you started for less that $200. Then you need some lighting/flash, and a focus arrangement.

The "rigs" FAQ thread links to a lot of examples. None of them is "wrong".
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
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Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ChrisR gave you the short version. Here's a longer version of the same basic ideas, that I was typing while he posted.

eric dolphy wrote:
for example, what I've gleaned thus far is that an objective with the infinity marking requires the extension tube apparatus--to replicate the microscope configuration it was designed for...

whereas an objective without the infinity mark is--what?--attached directly to the front of the DSLR

I am a bit puzzled. It appears that either you have misread the FAQ: How can I hook a microscope objective to my camera?, or something has gotten scrambled in your attempt at summary.

An objective with the infinity marking is designed to be used with a "tube lens" behind it. That lens can be an ordinary telephoto lens, as shown in the FAQ, or it can be some sort of short-barrel lens such as a Raynox 150, mounted on long enough extension to make the tube lens by itself, without the objective, focus at infinity. That latter configuration is not shown in the FAQ, though it should be. An example using fixed extension tubes is shown at http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=143195#143195 . Bellows can be used in place of the extension tubes. The optical path behind the tube lens is just empty space in either case.

An objective without the infinity mark will contain another mark like 160/- or 160/0.17 or 210/0. These marks indicate that the objective is intended to be used on empty extension totaling 150 or 200 mm from the shoulder of the mounting threads to the sensor, as explained in the FAQ. The empty extension can be either fixed tubes or adjustable bellows.

All of this information appears in the first posting of the FAQ thread, except for the Raynox-on-extension-tubes setup. I suggest to read the FAQ again, slowly, several times, until you can match up what is said there with what is said here. Of course there is still the possibility that we will not have communicated correctly, since I wrote both the FAQ and this current reply.

Quote:
(someone at that thread asked about the pros and cons of each, without a response)

I have just now re-scanned all six pages of the FAQ thread, and I cannot get my eye on any unanswered questions. Can you point more precisely to the question?

As for a list of the pros and cons, that would be misleading. Infinite and finite objectives are just different, neither design better than the other when they are used away from the microscope. Modern high end objectives are all infinite, because there are compelling reasons for microscope manufacturers to design their systems that way. Older and/or lower priced objectives can be either finite or infinite. Performance varies from one particular model of objective to another, but this is not well correlated with finite versus infinite. Infinite objectives do have the advantage that their magnification can be varied by changing the focal length of the tube lens, without introducing any optical aberrations. This is particularly effective with high end objectives such as the Mitutoyo M Plan Apo series, when used on crop-factor sensors for which the objectives have relatively large fields. However, finite objectives can also have their magnification varied by changing the extension length. This introduces a small amount of optical aberration, but in practice the main limitation is again just field size.

I hope this helps, but to be honest I have doubts that it will. Reading across all your posts, I get the feeling you are looking for some sort of shortcut "just do it this way" recipe. Such recipes are in short supply here at photomacrography.net. There are a few basic principles -- which you seem to have missed so far, despite our best efforts -- and there is a large universe of tradeoffs and refinements. If you'd like to see some indication of that, follow the several dozen links provided at http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=55311#55311 (in the FAQ: What's the best way to focus?) to see the very wide range of systems that people have put together to do focus stacking.

Of the lenses that you listed, I recognize the E Plan as one of Nikon's CF series. It is "known good" in the sense that it will work pretty well especially with an APS-C sized sensor such as your D7000. The -W- lens is designed to look through water and might or might not work OK without the water. Pass on that one. I do not recognize the Ph 1 DL objective. I think it is pre-CF, which means that you would be likely to get color fringes in using it separated from the eyepieces it was designed to be used with. I would avoid that one also.

It might be helpful if you back clear out to the beginning and tell us in narrative form what you want you do, how often you want to do it, and how much you had hoped to spend in the effort. Point to some examples of other people's work that you would like to emulate, and perhaps we can help you to do that within your own constraints. So far we know only that you have an AO 150 microscope and a D7000 camera, you've said that you're interested in micro fossils and insects, and you're asking questions about 10X objectives.

Edited to add: Alternatively, it might indeed be a better idea to get together one-on-one and highly interactive, as you suggest in your other thread at http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34787 . I am not the person you are looking for, however.

--Rik
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