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Unknown flower, can any one identify?

 
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austrokiwi1



Joined: 14 Sep 2014
Posts: 335

PostPosted: Sun Apr 02, 2017 11:30 am    Post subject: Unknown flower, can any one identify? Reply with quote

Each year I see these flowers( in Spring) that do not have any associated leaves.. Can some one tell me what they are? Sorry I only had an old legacy lens so its not much of a close up. Lens is Canon (S mount) 50mm F0.95


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Troels



Joined: 15 Feb 2016
Posts: 266
Location: Denmark, Engesvang

PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 2017 1:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It would be usefull to know where in the world the picture is taken. Your user name could indicate somewhere around New Zealand?

If I saw something like this in northern Europe I would say: Lathraea squamaria (scrophulariaceae). It is common on good soils in woods in April.

Easily recognisable by the lack of green colors. It has no chloroplasts because it has specialized in parasiting the roots of different trees and bushes, preferably hazel (Corylus).



It might have some similar relatives in New Zealand?

Troels
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