www.photomacrography.net :: View topic - Can one microscope do it all??
www.photomacrography.net Forum Index
An online community dedicated to the practices of photomacrography, close-up and macro photography, and photomicrography.
Photomacrography Front Page Amateurmicrography Front Page
Old Forums/Galleries
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Can one microscope do it all??

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Beginners Micro
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Davids



Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 142

PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2017 12:11 pm    Post subject: Can one microscope do it all?? Reply with quote

Eventually I would like to purchase a microscope for photography. I would like it for darkfield, phase contrast, epi illumination and epi fluorescence. Is it possible to do all of the above with one system? Furthermore, does this exist in an inverted microscope system? The reason why I'm leaning towards an inverted system is the ability to place large specimens on the stage.

Thanks for any input!

David
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
JohnyM



Joined: 24 Dec 2013
Posts: 166

PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2017 7:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have Nikon microphot with all those techniques with addition of DIC and Polarization. Define large? I dont see any problems with specimens that i would use the microscope to view (and multiple times larger than that).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Ichthyophthirius



Joined: 07 Mar 2013
Posts: 730

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2017 6:07 am    Post subject: Re: Can one microscope do it all?? Reply with quote

Davids wrote:
darkfield, phase contrast, epi illumination and epi fluorescence.


Hi David,

Epifluorescence on an inverted microscope is a more recent thing; it became more widely used from maybe the 1980s. Epi-illumination was done on inverted metallurgical microscopes. However, you can often use epifluorescence illuminator for epi-illumination by inserting a mirror block instead of a filter block, and using a set of pol filters.

The most useful epi-illumination technique is epi-darkfield which is quite specialised (in contrast to the widespread but less useful epi-brightfield).

For transmitted darkfield, you need to decide what NA you want. Low NA can be done easily with a darkfield slider and a normal long working distance condenser. High NA darkfield requires oil immersion condensers and is more difficult to do (requires a microscope on which a condenser with short working distance can actually be mounted).

Inverted stands that should be able to do most of what you want are the Leitz Diavert and Leitz Fluovert. Other highly versatile inverted stands are the Zeiss IM35, Olympus IMT-2 and Nikon Diaphot.

It might be easier to have two stands, one for biological (transmitted darkfield, phase, epi-fluorescence) and one metallurgical (epi-illumination).

Regards, Ichty
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Davids



Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 142

PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2017 11:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One thing I am uncertain about is the ability to alter stage height for objectives with different parfocal distances, say using a Mitutoyo M Plan APO 20x NA 0.42 vs a Nikon CFI Plan Fluor objective.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Ichthyophthirius



Joined: 07 Mar 2013
Posts: 730

PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2017 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi David,

The objectives you mentioned are part of "infinity" microscopes systems. All the microscopes I mentioned are conventional microscopes with 160/170 mm tube length, so they would not be useful for you.

For the infinity systems, you usually need to use the manufacturers own microscope stands with their own specific tube lenses. There is no/very limited interchangability.

If you want to attach just a single microscope objective to a camera, this might be more useful for you: http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=76195

Also keep in mind that the Mitutoyo M Plan APO 20x NA 0.42 is corrected for use without a cover glass ("0") so it's not as good for transmitted light applications that require a cover glass.

If you want to find a Nikon CFI inverted biological microscope that can also take Mitutoyo objectives, I have to admit, I don't know Very Happy It is extremely long (+20 mm working distance) http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/userpix/159_20X_1.jpg

Ichty
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pau
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Jan 2010
Posts: 4010
Location: Valencia, Spain

PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2017 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You would need to use a self arranged variable height microscope like the extremely nice setup of Charles Krebs:
http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=144389#144389

In most cases having different stands for different optics will be easier
_________________
Pau
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Beginners Micro All times are GMT - 7 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group