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Mulleins (Verbascum Species And Cultivars)

 
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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Thu Jun 13, 2013 12:03 pm    Post subject: Mulleins (Verbascum Species And Cultivars) Reply with quote

I find Mulleins interesting plants for ytheir growth forms and the structure and colour of their flower.

I found some in habitat in Northern Greece:

http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=130790#130790

And I have a similar species (V. phlomoides?) or cultivar in my garden:



This, and the close-ups were shot with my Kiron 105mm macro, mostly at f11, ISO 400, typically 1/800 sec (very gusty, strong wind).

Here you can see the flower and the wooly clothing of the plant:



A close look at the flower:



A diiferent angle:



And front two angles at the same time aka stereo (crosseye):



This is best viewed from a moderate distance. Not the stereo with the most imapact of my collection but of some interest.

Harold
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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 12:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

During the above session, the sky was dotted with small clouds, moving rapidy, such that the lighting would change between full sun and blue sky with the sun blocked by a cloud and back, often very quickly.

These two shots were subject to such a sudden change. They give the opportunity to illustrate why bright, direct sunlight is anathema to specialist flower photographers. I have brightened up the image shot when the sun was blocked to give an approximate match to the brightness of the one shot in fiull sun. Otherwise they were processed identically.



Harold
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baro-nite



Joined: 25 Feb 2013
Posts: 58
Location: North Carolina, USA

PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 5:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice to see that mullein has an interesting flower -- this is a reliable wildflower in summer where I am (when wildflowers tend to be in short supply). Not native here (USA) but well established.
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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 6:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Jeff.

More to come, pink and blue. These cultivars have taken me several attempts to get to the flower stage.

Harold
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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Wed Jun 19, 2013 1:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As promised, here are some more images, this time of one of the small cultivars, this one is Blue Lagoon. The plant is currently reaching just above knee height. The flowers average around 30mm diameter.

I had a lot of difficulty getting this one to flowering stage, having had several replacement plants over two years. When I photographed it it had only these two flowers but now has several.

Hardware and settings as before:









Harold
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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
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Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 2:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is the final cultivar, Pink Pixie. The plant and flowers are of a similar size to Blue Lagoon.

Lens as previously:







[Edit] I thought I had shot a stereo pair but had not. I did so this morning. The lighting was poor but the result is acceptable.

Cross-eye:

f16 1/25 ISO 800, hand-held.



[Edit ends]

Harold
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brian1208



Joined: 13 Jun 2013
Posts: 12
Location: Dorset, UK

PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2013 4:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

that's a nice set Harold, its a fascinating species.

We recently came across some being munched by the Mullein Moth Caterpillar. Seeing how tough looking the leaves appear I was surprised at the mess they were making of them
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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2013 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Brian.

These images show how our appreciation of detailed flower structure can be increased by macro photos.

The caterpillar is of rather striking appearance.. I have shots on film.

harold
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brian1208



Joined: 13 Jun 2013
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Location: Dorset, UK

PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2013 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

they are that Harold, I got some decent images with the EM-5 and the kit lens in semi-macro mode (left the proper macro at home - of course Wink )

Got the important bit though, those munching jaws
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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2013 10:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

brian1208 wrote:
Got the important bit though, those munching jaws

Don't let them loose here!

Harold
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