Wanted: numerous- stackshot or linear stage plus lenses.

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Koorosh
Posts: 215
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2014 3:39 pm
Location: London

Wanted: numerous- stackshot or linear stage plus lenses.

Post by Koorosh »

Hi Everyone,

I'm nearly at the stage of buying my kit (February will be the time), and I thought it might be a good idea to ask here first for some parts to see if any of you have pieces going for a good price.

Things I'm looking for:

A stackshot, or a linear stage with suitable actuator for beyond 20x mag if possible.

A componon S 2.8 enlarger lens

Suitable bellows

Raynox DCR 125 (this IS the one for equivalent of 200mm tube lens isn't it??)

A 100mm lens like a Minolta which will fit a Sony a6000/ a5100.

Any other bits and bobs like attachments which might help.

I should mention that I'm in the UK if that potentially poses an issue.

Any help or advice on where to buy if not would be appreciated.

All the best and thank you :)

rjlittlefield
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Re: Wanted: numerous- stackshot or linear stage plus lenses.

Post by rjlittlefield »

Koorosh wrote:Raynox DCR 125 (this IS the one for equivalent of 200mm tube lens isn't it??)
No, the number is DCR-150. See http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/v ... 195#143195 for example setups.

I don't think there is such a thing as DCR 125.

--Rik

Koorosh
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Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2014 3:39 pm
Location: London

Post by Koorosh »

My bad, 150 was what I meant. Thank you :)

dickb
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Re: Wanted: numerous- stackshot or linear stage plus lenses.

Post by dickb »

Koorosh wrote:A 100mm lens like a Minolta which will fit a Sony a6000/ a5100.
No Minolta lens fits an a6000 without adapter. Are you looking for the older Minolta MC/MD (SR mount) lens or the newer Minolta AF (A mount) lens? Either one fits Sony E mount, with the matching adapter. The A mount even keeps AF and EXIF data with the (expensive) Sony adapters.

I would suggest getting lenses and bellows of just one system, for instance Minolta MD or Canon FD - these are fairly cheap since their use is limited on anything but mirrorless cameras. Get sturdy bellows, like the Minolta Auto Bellows 1, preferably with a non-stationary rear standard, like the Canon Auto Bellows FD. For the 100mm macro lens, do you want f/2.8 or can you live with f/4.0? Do you need 1:1 magnification without additional hardware or is 1:2 enough? For use in a studio it doesn't matter that much, but in the field it can be very nice to have continuous focus to 1:1.

I would recommend the Kiron 105mm f/2.8 if you want f/2.8 and 1:1, or the Minolta MD or Canon FD 100mm f/4 if you prefer a lighter weight lens and f/4 and 1:2. The Tokina 90mm f/2.5 1:2 is a good option as well.

Koorosh
Posts: 215
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2014 3:39 pm
Location: London

Post by Koorosh »

Ah thank you for the info! I was under the impression that the Minolta lenses fitted the a6000 so thanks for the heads up.
I can't find a sale for that f 2.8 lens. It would be nice to get a lens which I could use more in the field certainly. Do you have any other suggestions for this? Are there no old lenses that fit without an adapter or is it going to be that way for any lenses?

dickb
Posts: 266
Joined: Mon Jul 05, 2010 1:54 am

Post by dickb »

Koorosh wrote:Ah thank you for the info! I was under the impression that the Minolta lenses fitted the a6000 so thanks for the heads up.
I can't find a sale for that f 2.8 lens. It would be nice to get a lens which I could use more in the field certainly. Do you have any other suggestions for this? Are there no old lenses that fit without an adapter or is it going to be that way for any lenses?
The Sony A6000 is a Sony E-mount camera, only E-mount lenses fit directly. Sony also makes cameras with the Sony A-mount, that is identical to the Minolta A-mount. Sony makes several different A to E mount adapters, so you can use Minolta A mount lenses on Sony E mount cameras. Other manufacturers make lots of other adapters to Sony E mount, that allow you to use a great number of lenses with different mounts. AF and electronic aperture aren't that useful in macrophotography anyway, so using a simple and cheap adapter to a manual focus mount of your choice may be the most practical way for you.

Maybe you should clarify what you want to use this system for in more detail so we can more precise in our recommendations.

Koorosh
Posts: 215
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2014 3:39 pm
Location: London

Post by Koorosh »

Right, that makes a lot more sense now, thank you.

I'm intending to use the 105mm lens as both a half length tube lens in conjunction with Nikon BE objectives, as well as ideally taking out into the field for use there. I guess my area of interest within field photography lies within taking images of insects and other details within things.

A lot of withins within that sentence. I apologise.

dickb
Posts: 266
Joined: Mon Jul 05, 2010 1:54 am

Post by dickb »

Koorosh wrote:Right, that makes a lot more sense now, thank you.

I'm intending to use the 105mm lens as both a half length tube lens in conjunction with Nikon BE objectives, as well as ideally taking out into the field for use there. I guess my area of interest within field photography lies within taking images of insects and other details within things.

A lot of withins within that sentence. I apologise.
OK, that makes things clearer. For insects in the field working distance can be crucial, the distance between the front bit of the lens and the subject. I like using my Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro or my Canon FD 200mm f/4, these give a little more room to maneuver than 100mm lenses.

Anyway, there are a lot of macro lenses in the 90mm to 105mm range, all of them good to excellent performers:

- Vivitar 90mm f/2.8 1:1 (often quite cheap)
- Tokina 90mm f/2.5 AT-X (a little better, but much more expensive)
- Kiron 105mm f/2.8 1:1 (also sold as Vivitar Series 1 100mm f/2.8 )
- Vivitar 135mm f/2.8 Close Focus 1:2 (often very cheap but quite good)
- Minolta 100mm f/4.0 MD (not as fast as some others but fairly lightweight and very good)

To name just a few of my collection. I would search for a nice, heavy and sturdy bellows and a matching 100mm macro lens.

Koorosh
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Location: London

Post by Koorosh »

Thank you very much for the advice- I will keep my eye out for those lenses :D

lauriek
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Post by lauriek »

Of course with photography everything is swings and balances. You gain working distance with a 150/200mm macro lens but you're more prone to camera shake and you lose the ability to easily (and significantly) increase magnification by adding cheap extension tubes

Koorosh
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Location: London

Post by Koorosh »

In what way? Does it decrease image quality quickly?

SONYNUT
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Post by SONYNUT »

You can get an adapter for just about any lens since the lens register is so short on the e-mount...i found an olympus om with a 50mm lens for 7 bucks at goodwill...the lens works great on the a6000...you can get 42mm adapters too..shoot in raw
..............................................................................
Just shoot it......

rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

Koorosh wrote:In what way? Does it decrease image quality quickly?
I assume you're asking about lauriek's comment that "you lose the ability to easily (and significantly) increase magnification by adding cheap extension tubes" with a 150/200mm macro lens.

The issue is that the amount of added magnification is equal to the extension tube length divided by the macro lens's effective focal length at closest focus. Most macro lenses get shorter focal lengths as the ring is turned to make them focus closer. A 100 mm macro may shorten to around 70 mm at 1:1, so adding a typical 65 mm of tubes will take you from 1:1 to almost 2:1. But the same tubes with the corresponding shortening in a 200 macro would take you from 1:1 to only about 1.5:1. It's not that you lose all ability to increase magnification with longer lenses, just that the ability gets reduced.

--Rik

Koorosh
Posts: 215
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2014 3:39 pm
Location: London

Post by Koorosh »

You can get an adapter for just about any lens since the lens register is so short on the e-mount...i found an olympus om with a 50mm lens for 7 bucks at goodwill...the lens works great on the a6000...you can get 42mm adapters too..shoot in raw
Yeah I was attracted to that prospect too :) I just got a brand new a6000 with the kit lens for 350 quid!!

On the lens side of things, I just bought a 135mm Vivitar prime, f/3.5 for 20 quid. I did a bit of research on serial numbers, and there seems to be some connection with the first two numbers being the manufacturer that made them. Am I right to think that 1) 37 is supposed to correspond to Tokina, and 2) that Tokina were good at making lenses? The corresponding m42 adapter was less than a tenner as well.

I assume you're asking about lauriek's comment that "you lose the ability to easily (and significantly) increase magnification by adding cheap extension tubes" with a 150/200mm macro lens.
Yes that was the one- thank you for the info on that. I'm slowly learning. Still feel a bit dim on the subject to say the least, but I'm slowly getting there.

I now have, a 50mm Componon-s 2.8 made in 83-84 (had they been multi-coated by then by the way?), a Sony a6000, a Vivitar 135mm prime, Nikon BE 4x and 10x objectives, a Raynox DCR-150 and Lomo bellows which can be adjusted from both ends.

Another question. Why does the DCR-150 work as a 200mm lens and not a 105mm lens? It is smaller magnification than the 250 isn't it?

Still looking for the right bit of equipment for focussing with. So far, this is what I have my eye on, to be used in conjunction with a cheap focussing rail for course adjustment at low mag. I really want a microscope focussing block with a good distance of travel on fine focus, but can't find that as yet. Any thoughts?


http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/151411875503? ... EBIDX%3AIT

Then there's the adapters.... And lighting..... And building a rig to fit it altogether.... Oh and I've just thought I haven't factored in the price of a stacking program!!!! Oh dear :'(

rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

Koorosh wrote:Another question. Why does the DCR-150 work as a 200mm lens and not a 105mm lens? It is smaller magnification than the 250 isn't it?
"Magnification" depends on how the lenses are used.

The DCR-150 is quoted as 4.8 diopter, which calculates to be 208.33 mm focal length. The DCR-250 is quoted as 8 diopter, which calculates to be 125 mm focal length.

If you use them as add-on closeup lenses, the DCR-250 gives more magnification because it lets you get closer to the subject.

But if you use them as tube lenses, then the DCR-250 gives less magnification because it fits closer to the camera.

--Rik

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