Spiders' coloration--especially in UV--can lure prey

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Chris S.
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Spiders' coloration--especially in UV--can lure prey

Post by Chris S. »

I found this BBC News piece interesting: Spiders normally keep a low profile, but some of them have evolved striking visual displays to lure their prey into their clutches.

I was well-aware of spiders using camouflage, but new to me was the concept that their coloration--particularly under ultraviolet light--may lure prey. For the few among us with UV-spectrum macro setups, this would be an interesting area to explore.

--Chris

Alex H
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Location: Stockholm, Sweden
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Post by Alex H »

The BBC article seem to be oversimplifying the UV "story" but I have no grounds to comment on it. Instead, here are two examples of spiders shot in visible (top) and UV (bottom) spectrum.

Image

Image
Oleksandr Holovachov
www.holovachov.com

Chris S.
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Post by Chris S. »

Alex, thanks for your response and images! :D

This is a photographic regime with which I have zero personal experience, so I'll ask a few questions:
  • 1--What equipment did you use for your images?

    2--What wavelengths of light did you record?

    3--Do the recorded wavelengths correspond closely with wavelengths perceivable by the insect prey species of these spiders, so far as is known?
With regards,

--Chris

Alex H
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Joined: Sat Sep 28, 2013 12:39 am
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Contact:

Post by Alex H »

Chris S. wrote:1--What equipment did you use for your images?
Custom made dual camera setup with one regular camera and one full-spectrum modified camera.
Chris S. wrote:2--What wavelengths of light did you record?
Visible image was recorded by ordinary camera, so somewhere between 410 and 690 nm.

Reflected UV image represents a range between approximately 340 and 390 nm.
Chris S. wrote:3--Do the recorded wavelengths correspond closely with wavelengths perceivable by the insect prey species of these spiders, so far as is known?
That depends if the potential prey can perceive red or not, and if its UV sensitivity range matches the UV region recorded by the camera. That will depend on the species of potential prey.
Oleksandr Holovachov
www.holovachov.com

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