Carr: A Happy Hunting Ground?

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Harold Gough
Posts: 5786
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 2:17 am
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

Carr: A Happy Hunting Ground?

Post by Harold Gough »

My wife and I came across the term Carr today, when reading about a fungus found in such a habitat. It seems like a potentially rich habitat for photography:

http://www.broads-authority.gov.uk/mana ... dland.html

Harold
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.

Ken Ramos
Posts: 7208
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2006 2:12 pm
Location: lat=35.4005&lon=-81.9841

Post by Ken Ramos »

Sounds like the area down below my home. There is a small creek down there, and the area, though probably not a fen of sorts, is an expanse of Alders, Brambles, Wild Rose, and Beech and Birch trees, along with a multitude of woody vines, ferns of which some are quite large, mosses, some liverworts, not a lot and other low growing plants, including numerous early spring wildlfowers such as anemones. For some reason the word carr rings a distant bell, as though I have ran across that word before. :-k

Harold Gough
Posts: 5786
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 2:17 am
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

Post by Harold Gough »

Ken Ramos wrote:probably not a fen of sorts
That's not too relevant. The link I posted was of a fen website, giving the carr development story from a fen starting point. As I understand it, potentially, any waterside or other badly-drained location can become a carr. The alder is the only one of the tree/shrub community which is specific to such wet ground.

Harold
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.

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